and, brain, have, inflammation, neurological, not, patients, study, that, the, Uncategorized

‘A silent killer’ — COVID-19 shown to trigger inflammation in the brain

‘A silent killer’ — COVID-19 shown to trigger inflammation in the brain

A new study has found that COVID-19 can trigger inflammation in the brain, even in patients who do not exhibit any neurological symptoms.

The study, published in the journal Radiology, looked at the brain scans of 48 patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection and found that 38 of them showed evidence of brain inflammation.

The patients who showed brain inflammation were more likely to be older, have diabetes, and to have higher levels of the inflammation-causing cytokine IL-6 in their blood.

While the study does not show that COVID-19 causes brain damage, it does suggest that the virus can lead to neurological problems in some patients.

COVID-19 is already known to cause a wide range of neurological problems, including encephalitis, stroke, and seizures. This new study suggests that the virus may also trigger inflammation in the brain, even in patients who do not exhibit any neurological symptoms.

If further studies confirm these findings, it could have important implications for the treatment of COVID-19. inflammatory brain disease are often treated with steroids, which could help to reduce the severity of COVID-19 symptoms in some patients.

A new study has shown that the coronavirus can cause inflammation in the brain, even in people who do not show any symptoms of the disease. This finding is worrisome, as it suggests that the virus may cause long-term damage to the brain even in people who seem to recover from the disease.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Queensland in Australia, looked at the brains of eight people who had died from COVID-19. All of the subjects had no history of neurological problems.

Upon examination, the researchers found evidence of inflammation in the brains of all eight subjects. This finding is concerning, as it suggests that the virus may cause long-term damage to the brain, even in people who seem to recover from the disease.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Benjamin Neelon, says that more research is needed to understand the full extent of the damage that the virus can cause to the brain. However, he says that the findings of this study highlight the need for people who have contracted the virus to be monitored for possible neurological problems even after they have recovered from the disease.

Back to list

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *