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Advanced melanoma survival improves significantly when immunotherapy is given before targeted therapy

Advanced melanoma survival improves significantly when immunotherapy is given before targeted therapy

A new study has found that patients with advanced melanoma who are given immunotherapy before targeted therapy have significantly improved survival rates.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, and published in The New England Journal of Medicine, looked at the records of nearly 1,000 patients with advanced melanoma who had been treated with either immunotherapy or targeted therapy. The researchers found that the patients who were given immunotherapy before targeted therapy had a median overall survival of 21.9 months, compared to only 12.5 months for those who were given targeted therapy first.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Adil Daud, said that the findings “support the use of immunotherapy as the preferred initial therapy” for advanced melanoma. He added that the findings also “support the role of immunotherapy in combination with targeted therapy” for patients who do not respond to immunotherapy alone.

The study’s findings are significant because they suggest that immunotherapy may be more effective than targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced melanoma. However, it is important to note that the study was observational, and therefore, further research is needed to confirm the findings.

Immunotherapy improves the survival of patients with advanced melanoma, according to a new study. The study found that immunotherapy given before targeted therapy significantly improves the survival of patients with advanced melanoma. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

The study was a phase III clinical trial that included 1022 patients with advanced melanoma. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either immunotherapy or targeted therapy. The immunotherapy group received ipilimumab plus nivolumab, while the targeted therapy group received dabrafenib plus trametinib.

The primary endpoint of the study was overall survival. The study found that the immunotherapy group had a median overall survival of 26.8 months, while the targeted therapy group had a median overall survival of 15.7 months. The difference in overall survival was significant, with a hazard ratio of 0.60. This means that the immunotherapy group was 40% less likely to die than the targeted therapy group.

The study also looked at the safety of the two treatments. The immunotherapy group had more grade 3 or 4 adverse events than the targeted therapy group. However, the immunotherapy group also had a higher response rate, with 51% of patients achieving a complete response or partial response, compared to 36% of patients in the targeted therapy group.

The study showed that immunotherapy is a more effective treatment than targeted therapy for advanced melanoma. The survival benefit of immunotherapy was significant, and the immunotherapy group had a higher response rate. The immunotherapy group also had more side effects, but the side effects were manageable.

The study provides strong evidence that immunotherapy should be the new standard of care for advanced melanoma. Targeted therapy should be reserved for patients who do not respond to immunotherapy or who cannot tolerate immunotherapy.

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