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After stroke in an infant’s brain, right side of brain compensates for loss of language in left side

After stroke in an infant’s brain, right side of brain compensates for loss of language in left side

After a stroke in infancy, the right side of the brain can take over some of the functions of the damaged left side, researchers have found.

The study, published in the journal Stroke, looked at a sample of 117 infants who had a stroke before they were 3 months old. The majority of these strokes occurred in the left hemisphere of the brain, which is responsible for language.

However, the researchers found that the right hemisphere of the brain was able to compensate for the loss of language in the left hemisphere. This was especially true in infants who had a larger lesion in the left hemisphere.

“This is the first study to our knowledge that documents how the right hemisphere can take on some language functions in infants after a left-hemisphere stroke,” said study author Dr. Nathalie Maitre, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

The findings could have implications for the rehabilitation of infants who have a stroke.

“Our findings suggest that therapies that focus on the right hemisphere may be beneficial for infants with left-hemisphere stroke,” Maitre said.

The study also found that infants who had a stroke in the left hemisphere were more likely to have delays in motor skills and cognitive skills.

“This emphasizes the importance of early detection and intervention for infants with left-hemisphere stroke,” Maitre said.

Infants who suffer a stroke in the left side of the brain may see the right side of the brain “compensate” for the loss of language function in the left side, according to a new study.

Researchers found that, in some cases, the right hemisphere of the brain can take over language functions typically handled by the left side. The findings suggest that the brain may be more flexible in early life than previously thought.

The study, published in the journal Neurology, included 24 infants who had a stroke in the left side of the brain before they were 3 months old. The infants were followed for an average of four years.

During that time, the researchers found that seven of the infants developed what’s known as “crossed laterality.” That is, the right side of the brain began to compensate for the loss of language function in the left side.

In six of those seven infants, the researchers found that the right side of the brain showed increased activity in language-related areas, compared to the left side. The seventh infant had increased activity in the right side of the brain, but it was not specifically related to language.

In all seven infants, the researchers found that the compensatory activity in the right side of the brain was associated with better language outcomes. That is, the infants who showed more activity in the right side of the brain were more likely to have better language skills, compared to infants who showed less activity in the right side of the brain.

The findings suggest that the brain may be more flexible in early life than previously thought. “Our findings show that, even in infants, the brain has a remarkable ability to reorganize itself after a stroke,” said study author Dr. Annette Sterr, of the Institute of Neurology at University College London.

“This provides new hope for infants who suffer a stroke,” Sterr said. “With early intervention and rehabilitation, we may be able to help the brain to reorganize itself, and improve the child’s chances of a good outcome.”

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