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Antioxidant flavonols linked to slower memory decline

Antioxidant flavonols linked to slower memory decline

As people age, their memories naturally begin to decline. However, new research suggests that antioxidant flavonols may help to slow down memory decline.

Flavonols are a type of antioxidant that is found in certain fruits and vegetables, such as apples, onions, and tea. In the new study, researchers looked at data from nearly 2,000 adults aged 50 and over. They found that those who had higher levels of flavonols in their diet were more likely to have better memories and less brain atrophy than those who did not consume as many flavonols.

The findings suggest that flavonols may help to protect the brain from age-related damage and memory decline. However, the research is still in its early stages and more studies are needed to confirm these effects.

If you’re looking to protect your memory as you age, eating foods rich in flavonols is a good place to start. adding more flavonol-rich foods to your diet, such as apples, onions, and tea, may help to slow down memory decline.

A new study has found that antioxidant flavonols may help to slow down memory decline.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Northumbria, looked at a group of healthy adults aged 50 and over. The participants were given a range of tests to assess their memory and thinking skills. The results showed that those who had higher levels of antioxidant flavonols in their diet performed better on the tests than those who had lower levels.

The findings suggest that antioxidant flavonols could help to protect the brain from age-related damage. This is thought to be because the compounds help to reduce inflammation and improve blood flow to the brain.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Claire Williams, said that the findings add to the growing body of evidence that suggests diet can play a role in cognitive health. “This research adds to the emerging evidence that antioxidants, specifically flavonoids, may help to protect the brain from age-related decline,” she said.

Dr. Williams added that the study’s findings need to be replicated in a larger group of people before any firm conclusions can be drawn. However, she said that the findings suggest that diets rich in flavonoids could help to improve cognitive health in later life.

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