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Capsule delivery of fecal microbiota transplant has similar effectiveness to transplant by colonoscopy

Capsule delivery of fecal microbiota transplant has similar effectiveness to transplant by colonoscopy

Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), also known as a stool transplant, is a medical procedure used to treat chronic gastrointestinal conditions. The procedure involves transplanting feces from a donor into the gastrointestinal tract of a recipient. FMT is considered a microbiome therapy, as it is thought to introduce beneficial bacteria into the gut and improve the overall health of the gastrointestinal tract.

Capsule delivery of FMT has been shown to be as effective as traditional delivery methods, such as colonoscopy. A study published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases found that FMT delivered by capsule was just as effective as FMT delivered by colonoscopy in treating patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The study authors concluded that capsule delivery is a safe and effective alternative to colonoscopy for FMT delivery.

Capsule delivery of FMT has several advantages over other delivery methods. First, it is a less invasive procedure than colonoscopy. Second, it does not require the use of anesthesia, which can be associated with risks and side effects. Third, it is a less expensive procedure than colonoscopy. Finally, capsule delivery of FMT can be performed in an outpatient setting, which is convenient for patients.

If you are considering FMT for the treatment of a chronic gastrointestinal condition, talk to your doctor about the delivery method that is right for you.

Capsule delivery of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a promising, noninvasive alternative to conventional delivery by colonoscopy, but its efficacy and safety remain uncertain. In a randomized controlled trial, we compared the clinical outcomes of FMT delivered by colonoscopy or by a nasoduodenal capsule delivery system in patients with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). The primary outcome was freedom from CDI at 8 weeks after FMT. Secondary outcomes included recurrence of CDI and serious adverse events.

A total of 99 patients were randomly assigned to receive FMT by colonoscopy (n=50) or capsule (n=49). The colonoscopy and capsule groups were well matched for baseline characteristics. The primary outcome was achieved by 32 patients (64%) in the colonoscopy group and 28 (57%) in the capsule group (difference, 7 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], −12 to 26; P=0.45). Recurrence rates were similar in the two groups (8 of 50 patients [16%] in the colonoscopy group vs. 5 of 49 [10%] in the capsule group; difference, 6 percentage points; 95% CI, −6 to 18; P=0.33). The rate of serious adverse events was low and did not differ significantly between the two groups (2% in the colonoscopy group vs. 4% in the capsule group; difference, 2 percentage points; 95% CI, −3 to 8; P=0.50).

In conclusion, FMT delivered by colonoscopy or capsule was associated with similar rates of clinical cure and recurrence of CDI. Capsule delivery of FMT may be a safe and effective alternative to colonoscopy delivery, although larger studies are needed to confirm these findings.

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