ccl2, could, hub, inflammatory, macrophages, new, researchers, skin, that, the, Uncategorized

Control hub for skin inflammation discovered

Control hub for skin inflammation discovered

According to new research, scientists have discovered a control hub for skin inflammation. The discovery could lead to new ways to treat inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis, eczema, and acne.

The control hub is located in the skin’s basal layer, which is the layer of cells that sits just below the surface of the skin. The hub is made up of a type of cell called a macrophage. Macrophages are white blood cells that play a key role in the body’s immune response.

In the new study, published in the journal Nature, the researchers found that macrophages in the basal layer of the skin can be divided into two groups: those that promote inflammation and those that suppress it.

The researchers also found that the activity of these two groups of macrophages is regulated by a protein called CCL2. CCL2 is produced by skin cells in response to inflammation.

The findings suggest that CCL2 is a key regulator of inflammatory skin diseases. The researchers say that drugs that target CCL2 could be used to treat these conditions.

The new study provides insights into the complex mechanisms that regulate inflammation in the skin. The findings could lead to new and better treatments for inflammatory skin diseases.

A new study has identified a key controller of inflammation in the skin. The findings could lead to the development of new treatments for inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

The study, published in the journal Nature, was conducted by an international team of researchers from the University of Chicago, the University of California, San Francisco, and the immunology company Immudyne.

The researchers used a new technique called “genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 screening” to identify a key regulator of inflammation in the skin. They found that a protein called “NFATc1” is a key controller of inflammation in the skin.

The findings could lead to the development of new treatments for inflammatory skin diseases, such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. In the future, drugs that target NFATc1 could be used to treat these conditions.

The study was conducted by an international team of researchers from the University of Chicago, the University of California, San Francisco, and the immunology company Immudyne.

Back to list

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *