against, and, antibodies, are, not, that, the, Uncategorized, vaccine, virus, you

COVID-19: One in three infected but unvaccinated persons no longer have detectable antibodies one year after the infection

The study found that one in three people who had contracted the virus and did not receive a vaccine still had no detectable antibodies in their system a year later.

This is concerning because it means that these people are no longer protected against the virus and are at risk of contracting it again.

There are a few possible explanations for why this is happening. It could be that the virus is mutating and becoming more resistant to the antibodies that are produced.

It is also possible that the body is not producing enough antibodies to protect against the virus.

This is why it is so important to get vaccinated against the virus. The vaccine will help to ensure that your body produces enough antibodies to protect you against the virus.

It is also important to remember that the vaccine is not 100% effective. There is still a small chance that you could contract the virus even if you are vaccinated.

However, the chances of this happening are much lower if you are vaccinated. So, if you have not yet been vaccinated, it is important to do so as soon as possible.

COVID-19: One in three infected but unvaccinated persons no longer have detectable antibodies one year after the infection.

A new study has found that one in three persons who were infected with COVID-19 but not vaccinated against the disease no longer have detectable antibodies one year after the infection.

The study, which is set to be published in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases, also found that the antibodies of those who were vaccinated against COVID-19 were still detectable one year after the infection.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Sarah Gilbert, a professor of vaccinology at the University of Oxford, said that the findings “support the idea that vaccination could play a role in controlling COVID-19 in the long term.”

Gilbert added that the findings “also suggest that boosting strategies, such as re-vaccination or administration of booster doses of antibody-containing products, may be needed to maintain protection against COVID-19 in the long term.”

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Oxford and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

Back to list

Related Posts