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COVID-19 vaccination rates at NYC schools varied significantly by race/ethnicity and borough

As of April 7, nearly two-thirds of public school students in New York City have been vaccinated against COVID-19, but there are significant disparities by race and ethnicity, as well as by borough.

Black and Hispanic students are lagging significantly behind white and Asian students in terms of vaccination rates. In the Bronx, for instance, only 42 percent of Black students and 46 percent of Hispanic students have been vaccinated, compared to 70 percent of white students and 79 percent of Asian students.

Similarly, in Manhattan, 53 percent of Black students and 54 percent of Hispanic students have been vaccinated, compared to 74 percent of white students and 82 percent of Asian students.

The overall vaccination rate for public school students in Brooklyn is 63 percent, but again there are significant disparities by race and ethnicity. Only 48 percent of Black students and 50 percent of Hispanic students have been vaccinated, compared to 71 percent of white students and 77 percent of Asian students.

In Queens, the overall vaccination rate is slightly higher, at 65 percent, but the disparities by race and ethnicity are similar to those in Brooklyn. Fifty percent of Black students and 52 percent of Hispanic students have been vaccinated, compared to 74 percent of white students and 79 percent of Asian students.

The vaccination rates for public school students in Staten Island are the highest of any borough, at 71 percent. But even here, there are significant disparities by race and ethnicity. Only 58 percent of Black students and 60 percent of Hispanic students have been vaccinated, compared to 77 percent of white students and 84 percent of Asian students.

These disparities are likely due to a number of factors, including mistrust of the government and the medical establishment among some communities of color, and logistical challenges in getting to vaccine sites.

But whatever the reasons, it is clear that much more needs to be done to ensure that all students have equitable access to the COVID-19 vaccine.

As the number of COVID-19 cases in New York City continue to rise, so does the importance of getting vaccinated. However, new data shows that there is a significant disparity in vaccination rates among different racial and ethnic groups in the city.

According to the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, as of March 8th, only 24.2% of white students in the city had been vaccinated against COVID-19, compared to 55.5% of Asian students, 50.4% of Hispanic students, and 46.4% of Black students.

There is also a significant difference in vaccination rates among different boroughs in the city. In Manhattan, for example, only 20.8% of students have been vaccinated, compared to 28.7% in the Bronx and 27.1% in Brooklyn.

This disparity is likely due to a variety of factors, including access to transportation and language barriers. It is important that the city address these disparities in order to ensure that all students have an equal opportunity to protect themselves against COVID-19.

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