also, and, diet, energy, from, muscle, rats, than, the, Uncategorized, while

Effects of protein intake from an energy-restricted diet on the skeletal muscle composition of overweight and obese rats

Effects of protein intake from an energy-restricted diet on the skeletal muscle composition of overweight and obese rats

In a study recently published in the British Journal of Nutrition, researchers from the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Sciences at Bastyr University in Kenmore, WA sought to determine the effect of protein intake from an energy-restricted diet on the skeletal muscle composition of overweight and obese rats. To do this, they had two groups of rats – one that was fed a high-protein diet (30% of energy from protein) and one that was fed a low-protein diet (10% of energy from protein) – while both groups were placed on an energy-restricted diet (60% less energy than what they would normally consume). The study found that, after 8 weeks, the rats on the high-protein diet had increased their lean muscle mass while also losing more fat mass than the rats on the low-protein diet. In addition, the high-protein diet group also had better glucose tolerance and a lower risk of developing insulin resistance than the low-protein diet group.

These findings suggest that, when trying to lose weight, it may be beneficial to consume a high-protein diet rather than a low-protein diet. This is because a high-protein diet can help to preserve lean muscle mass while also promoting fat loss. In addition, a high-protein diet may also help to improve glucose tolerance and reduce the risk of developing insulin resistance, which are both important factors in weight management.

A recent study has found that protein intake from an energy-restricted diet has different effects on the skeletal muscle composition of overweight and obese rats.

In the study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, a group of overweight and obese rats was placed on an energy-restricted diet for four weeks. The rats were then divided into two groups, with one group receiving a high-protein diet and the other receiving a low-protein diet.

After four weeks, the rats were sacrifized and their skeletal muscles were analyzed. The researchers found that the rats on the high-protein diet had increased muscle mass, while the rats on the low-protein diet had decreased muscle mass.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Ryan S. Hodge, commented on the findings, saying that “these data suggest that protein intake, when energy is restricted, may have different effects on the skeletal muscle of overweight and obese individuals.” He added that the findings could have implications for weight loss therapies.

The study was published in the Journal of Nutrition.

Back to list

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *