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Fasting-mimicking diet reduces signs of dementia in mice

Fasting-mimicking diet reduces signs of dementia in mice

A new study has found that a fasting-mimicking diet may help to reduce the signs of dementia in mice.

The study, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Southern California, found that the diet helped to improve the mice’s cognitive abilities and also reduced the levels of beta-amyloid proteins in their brains.

Beta-amyloid proteins are believed to be one of the main causes of Alzheimer’s disease.

The fasting-mimicking diet used in the study consisted of a low-calorie, low-protein and high-fat diet.

The mice were placed on the diet for five days every month for six months.

At the end of the study, the mice that had been on the fasting-mimicking diet performed better on tests of spatial memory and learning, compared to the mice that were not on the diet.

In addition, the fasting-mimicking diet also reduced the levels of beta-amyloid proteins in the brains of the mice.

The findings of this study suggest that the fasting-mimicking diet may be a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease.

The study was published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

A new study from the University of Southern California has found that a fasting-mimicking diet may help to reduce some of the signs of dementia in mice.

The diet, which involves going without food for five days each month, appears to help to clear out damaged cells and improve cognitive function.

The study found that mice who were put on the diet for six months had increased levels of a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is known to be important for learning and memory.

The mice also performed better in tests of learning and memory than those that did not follow the diet.

USC researcher Valter Longo, who led the study, said that the findings suggest that the fasting-mimicking diet could be a potential treatment for dementia in humans.

The study was published in the journal Nature Communications.

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