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Gene mutation leading to autism found to overstimulate brain cells

Gene mutation leading to autism found to overstimulate brain cells

A new study has found that a gene mutation that leads to autism may overstimulate brain cells. The mutation, which is found in the gene known as CNTNAP2, gives rise to an overabundance of a protein that is involved in the development and function of nerve cells.

This protein, known as caspr2, is thought to play a role in the formation of the protective myelin sheath that surrounds nerve cells. The overstimulation of brain cells that results from the presence of this protein is thought to be a major contributor to the symptoms of autism.

The new study, which was conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, looked at a group of children with autism and a group of typically developing children. The researchers found that the children with autism had significantly higher levels of caspr2 in their brains.

This overabundance of caspr2 is thought to lead to an overstimulation of nerve cells, which can result in the symptoms of autism. The new study provides strong evidence that this gene mutation is a major contributor to autism.

Previous studies have also linked this gene mutation to other psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The new study provides further evidence that this gene mutation may be a major contributor to a variety of psychiatric disorders.

A new gene mutation that leads to autism has been found to overstimulate brain cells, according to a new study. The mutation, which is found in a gene called SHANK3, leads to the overstimulation of brain cells in a specific region of the brain called the amygdala. The amygdala is responsible for regulating emotions, and the overstimulation of its cells has been linked to the symptoms of autism.

This is the first time that a specific gene mutation has been linked to the overstimulation of brain cells in autism. The findings of this study could lead to the development of new treatments for autism that target the overstimulation of brain cells.

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