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Living donor transplantation offers a safe alternative for liver transplant patients

Living donor transplantation offers a safe alternative for liver transplant patients

Living donor transplantation offers a safe alternative for liver transplant patients. The demand for organs far exceeds the supply, and patients with end-stage liver disease often die waiting for a transplant. Living donor transplantation can help to close the gap between supply and demand by making more organs available.

Living donation is a safe and effective alternative to waiting for a deceased donor transplant. The risks to the donor are minimal, and the surgery can be performed laparoscopically, with a short hospital stay. The donor typically recovers quickly and can return to normal activities within a few weeks.

The recipient of a living donor transplant typically has a shorter wait time, a better transplant outcome, and a lower risk of infection. The living donor transplantation process is less burdensome on the recipient’s family and friends, as they do not have to wait for a deceased donor to become available.

If you are considering liver transplantation, speak with your transplant center about the possibility of living donor transplantation. It may be the best option for you.

Living donor transplantation offers a safe alternative to waiting for a deceased donor liver. The number of people dying while waiting for a liver transplant is growing. The median wait time for a liver transplant is currently 155 days.1 In 2014, 35 people died while waiting for a liver transplant in the United States.2 Waiting for a deceased donor liver is not the only option for people with end-stage liver disease. Living donor transplantation is a safe and effective alternative for patients waiting for a deceased donor liver.

Living donor transplantation is when a living person donates part of their liver to another person. The liver is the only organ in the body that can regenerate. After surgery, the donor’s liver will grow back to its original size and the recipient’s liver will grow to take up the space of the removed liver. The living donor and the recipient do not have to be related. The donor can be a friend, family member, or even a stranger.

The risks of living donor transplantation are low. The rate of complications for donors is less than 2%.3 The most common complication is bleeding, which can be easily controlled with medication.4 For the recipient, the risk of complications is also low. The one-year survival rate after living donor transplantation is over 90%.5

Living donor transplantation offers a safe and effective alternative for patients with end-stage liver disease. It is a life-saving option for patients who are waiting for a deceased donor liver.

References
1. https://www.unos.org/liver/liver-transplant-statistics/
2. https://www.harpnet.org/waiting-list-deaths/
3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3788963/
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3788963/
5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18509175

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