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New computational method builds detailed maps of human tissues

New computational method builds detailed maps of human tissues

Researchers have developed a new computational method for mapping the detailed three-dimensional structure of human tissues. The technique, known as THz tissue tomography, could someday be used to create personalized models of human organs for use in medical planning and research.

The THz regime lies between the microwave and infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. THz waves are able to penetrate human tissue, making them ideal for imaging. However, THR tissue tomography is a very challenging imaging modality because the THz waves are scattered by tissue structures.

Researchers from the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich have now developed a new computational method that can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of human tissue from THz images. The technique is based on a novel algorithm that takes into account the scattering of THz waves by tissue structures.

The algorithm was validated using simulations and experimental THz images of human tissue samples. The researchers were able to reconstruct detailed three-dimensional maps of the tissue samples with their technique.

The new computational method could be used to create personalized models of human organs for use in medical planning and research. The technique could also be used to study the effects of THz waves on human tissue.

doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-49167-0

Computational biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a new method for mapping the 3D architecture of tissues at the nanometer scale. The technique, called Nanowell seeding, can be used to study a variety of tissues, including the brain, heart, and kidney.

The team used the Nanowell seeding technique to map the 3D architecture of the brain’s vasculature. They found that the method could be used to study the brain’s microvasculature – the network of small blood vessels that is essential for brain function – with unprecedented detail.

The team is now working on applying the Nanowell seeding technique to other tissues, including the heart and kidney. The technique could be used to study a variety of diseases that affect these organs, including cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

The study was published in the journal Nature Methods.

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