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New imaging technique could speed up development of eye disease treatments

New imaging technique could speed up development of eye disease treatments

A new imaging technique that produces high-resolution, 3D images of the retina could speed up the development of treatments for a range of eye diseases, according to a new study.

The technique, known as swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT), produces images that are 10 times more detailed than those produced by conventional OCT.

This means that it can be used to detect very small changes in the retina, which could lead to the early detection of eye diseases such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.

The study, published in the journal Optics Letters, was conducted by researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Oxford.

“Our new imaging system provides a window into the retina that is unprecedented in terms of its resolution and its ability to see small changes in the tissue,” said study leader, Professor Robert MacLaren.

“This will be a major advance in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of eye diseases.”

The new system uses a laser to scan the retina in a “sweeping” motion, which produces a 3D image with a resolution of 15 microns.

This is 10 times higher than the resolution of conventional OCT, which is 150 microns.

The images produced by the new system are so detailed that they can be used to measure the thickness of the retina with an accuracy of 1 micron.

This is important because the thickness of the retina is a key indicator of the health of the eye.

The new system can also be used to measure the density of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which is a layer of cells that are crucial for the health of the retina.

“The RPE is responsible for eliminating waste products from the retina, and its density is a good indicator of the health of the retina,” said Professor MacLaren.

“Our new system can measure the density of the RPE with an accuracy of 1 percent, which is a significant improvement on existing methods.”

The new system could also be used to study the blood vessels in the retina, which are important for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues.

“We are very excited about the potential of this new technology,” said Professor MacLaren.

“It has the potential to transform the way we diagnose and treat a range of eye diseases.”

A new non-invasive imaging technique could speed up the development of treatments for a range of eye diseases, according to a study published in the journal Nature Medicine.

The technique, known as high-resolution photoacoustic ophthalmoscopy (HRPO), uses short bursts of near-infrared light to generate high-resolution images of the retina, the layer of nerve cells at the back of the eye that is responsible for vision.

HRPO is already being used to diagnose a range of eye diseases, but the new study, led by researchers at the University of Michigan, shows that it can also be used to track the progression of these diseases and to assess the effectiveness of potential treatments.

The researchers used HRPO to image the retina of mice with a form of macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in humans. They were able to track the progression of the disease and to show that a potential treatment, an anti-inflammatory drug, was effective in slowing its progression.

“Our study demonstrates that HRPO has great potential as a tool for investigating the progression of eye diseases and for testing new treatments,” said senior author Richard K. fullerton, M.D., Ph.D., the Paul S. Cook and Virginia Cook Professor of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Michigan.

“This is a non-invasive technique that could be used in humans and would provide a valuable complement to existing methods for tracking disease progression and testing new treatments.”

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

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