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Newly identified small molecules break amyloid tangles that cause Alzheimer’s

Newly identified small molecules break amyloid tangles that cause Alzheimer’s

Newly identified small molecules break amyloid tangles that cause Alzheimer’s

In a new study, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have identified small molecules that can break up the amyloid tangles in neurons that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.

While it is still very early in the research process, the findings could one day lead to a new therapeutic approach for treating Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

“Our approach was to look for small molecules that could directly bind to and disrupt the amyloid fibers that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease,” said J. David Sweatt, Ph.D., the C. Hampel Chair in Pharmacology in the UAB School of Medicine and senior author of the study.

“We found several compounds that were able to do this, and we are now working to optimize these molecules for their potential use as therapeutic agents.”

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, affecting an estimated 5.7 million people in the United States.

The disease is characterized by the build-up of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain.

The plaques are made up of amyloid beta peptides, which are thought to be the primary cause of the disease.

The tangles are made up of tau proteins, which are normally responsible for stabilizing microtubules in neurons.

In Alzheimer’s disease, the tau proteins become dysfunctional and clump together, forming the tangles.

The amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are thought to cause the death of neurons and the deterioration of cognitive function in Alzheimer’s patients.

Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, and the only treatments available are aimed at managing the symptoms.

The new study, published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, could one day lead to a new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease that targets the underlying cause of the disease.

In the study, the researchers screened a library of small molecules for their ability to bind to and disrupt amyloid fibers.

They identified several compounds that were able to bind to and break up the amyloid fibers.

One of the compounds, called PBT2, was found to be particularly effective at breaking up the amyloid fibers.

PBT2 is a small molecule that has previously been developed as a therapeutic agent for Alzheimer’s disease.

The compound is currently in clinical trials, but has not yet been approved by the FDA.

The new study shows that PBT2 is able to break up the amyloid fibers in neurons, which could potentially lead to a new therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease.

“This is an exciting new finding that could lead to the development of a new class of therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease,” said Sweatt.

“PBT2 is a small molecule that is already in clinical trials, so it could potentially be repurposed for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.”

The findings of the new study need to be replicated in larger studies in order to confirm the potential therapeutic potential of PBT2 and the other compounds that were identified in the study.

The researchers are currently working on optimizing the compounds for their potential use as therapeutic agents.

“We are optimistic that our findings could one day lead to new treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative diseases,” said Sweatt.

A new study has found that small molecules can break apart amyloid tangles, which are a major cause of Alzheimer’s disease.

The study, published in the journal Science, was conducted by a team of researchers at the University of Michigan.

The team used a technique called nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify two small molecules that are able to break apart amyloid tangles.

The first molecule, called a-synuclein, is found in the brain and is known to be involved in the formation of amyloid tangles.

The second molecule, called tau, is also found in the brain and is known to be involved in the breakdown of amyloid tangles.

The team found that the two molecules work together to break apart amyloid tangles.

“Our findings suggest that small molecules that can break apart amyloid tangles may be a new therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease,” said study author Thomas Kisieleski.

The team is now working to develop a drug that targets these molecules.

Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease. However, this new study provides hope that a cure may be on the horizon.

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