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Novel analysis shows the experience of reward increases connectivity between the default mode network and other brain regions

Novel analysis shows the experience of reward increases connectivity between the default mode network and other brain regions

A new study has found that the experience of reward increases connectivity between the default mode network and other brain regions. The findings, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, provide insight into how the brain processes rewards and could help to explain why some people are more responsive to rewards than others.

The default mode network is a set of brain regions that are active when a person is not actively engaged in a task. The network is thought to be involved in a variety of functions, including self-reflection and daydreaming. Previous research has shown that the default mode network is more active in people who are more responsive to rewards.

In the new study, researchers used fMRI to scan the brains of 42 participants as they played a game in which they could win or lose money. The researchers found that the experience of winning a reward increased connectivity between the default mode network and other brain regions, including the striatum, a region that is involved in motivation and reward-seeking behavior.

“Our findings suggest that the default mode network is not just a default state that the brain goes into when it is not occupied with a task,” said study author Christopher Kovach. “Instead, the default mode network may play an important role in how we process rewards and respond to them.”

The findings could have implications for understanding and treating disorders that are characterized by dysfunctional reward processing, such as addiction and depression. Future research will need to confirm the findings in larger samples and explore how they vary across different populations.

According to a recent study, the experience of reward increases connectivity between the default mode network and other brain regions. The findings, published in the journal Nature Neuroscience, provide new insights into how the brain processes rewards and how this may be linked to various psychiatric disorders.

The default mode network is a set of brain regions that are active when a person is not engaged in a specific task. This network is thought to be involved in a variety of cognitive processes, including self-reflection and daydreaming. Previous research has shown that the default mode network is hyperactive in individuals with psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

The new study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the brain activity of 37 healthy adults as they completed a task in which they could earn monetary rewards. The researchers found that the experience of reward was associated with increased connectivity between the default mode network and several other brain regions, including the striatum, thalamus, and prefrontal cortex.

The findings suggest that the default mode network is involved in the processing of rewards and that this may be dysregulated in psychiatric disorders. Future research will be needed to confirm these findings and to examine how they may be related to specific psychiatric disorders.

This study provides new insights into how the brain processes rewards and how this may be linked to psychiatric disorders. The findings suggest that the default mode network is involved in the processing of rewards and that this may be dysregulated in psychiatric disorders. Future research will be needed to confirm these findings and to examine how they may be related to specific disorders.

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