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Scientists illuminate how virus attacks cat kidney, could jump to humans

Scientists illuminate how virus attacks cat kidney, could jump to humans

In a new study, scientists have illuminated how a virus attacks cat kidneys, which could potentially jump to humans.

The findings, published in the journal Nature, could help researchers develop treatments for a range of diseases caused by viruses that target kidney cells, including some forms of human kidney cancer.

Until now, little was known about how this class of viruses, known as feline Caliciviruses (FCV), specifically infects cats.

But by studying FCV-infected cats, the team of scientists from the University of Edinburgh in the UK and the University of California, Davis in the US, were able to identify a key receptor that the virus uses to enter and infect kidney cells.

This receptor, known as P-selectin, is found on the surface of many types of cells, including those in the kidney.

The researchers found that the virus binds to P-selectin on the surface of kidney cells and then uses it to get inside the cells, where it can replicate and cause infection.

Interestingly, the team also found that P-selectin is required for the virus to cause disease in cats.

without it, the virus was unable to replicate in kidney cells or cause infection.

This is the first time that P-selectin has been shown to be necessary for a virus to cause disease.

What’s more, the team found that the virus that infects cats has a genetic mutation that allows it to bind to human P-selectin.

This suggests that the virus could potentially infect humans, although it is not yet known if this would cause disease.

The findings could help researchers to develop treatments for diseases caused by viruses that target kidney cells, including some forms of human kidney cancer.

In the future, the team plans to study whether the virus could be used as a tool to study and treat human diseases.

In a new study, scientists have illuminated how a virus attacks cat kidneys and found that it could potentially jump to humans.

The findings, published in the journal Nature, could help researchers develop treatments for the virus, which is a major cause of kidney disease in cats.

The virus, called feline viral rhabdovirus 3 (FVR3), is closely related to the viruses that cause human rabies and distemper.

FVR3 is a member of the rhabdoviruses, a large family of viruses that includes some of the most deadly pathogens on the planet, such as Ebola and Marburg.

The new study found that FVR3 enters cells by binding to a receptor on the cell surface called nectin-4.

Once the virus is inside the cell, it uses a protein called vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) to hijack the cell’s machinery and replicate.

VSV-G is a glycoprotein that is found on the surface of many viruses, including rabies and Ebola.

FVR3 is thought to cause kidney disease by damaging the cells that line the kidney’s filtering units, called glomeruli.

The virus is also known to attack the nervous system, and it is thought to be responsible for a neurological disease called feline encephalitis.

There is no cure for FVR3 infection, and it is fatal in most cases.

There is no vaccine for the virus, and there is no way to prevent its spread.

The only way to protect cats from FVR3 is to keep them from coming into contact with infected cats.

The new study provides the first evidence that FVR3 uses VSV-G to infect cells, and it raises the possibility that the virus could jump to humans.

VSV-G is found on the surface of many human viruses, including rabies and Ebola.

If FVR3 could infect human cells using VSV-G, it could potentially cause a devastating outbreak of disease.

The new study is an important step in understanding how FVR3 causes disease and how it could potentially jump to humans.

However, more research is needed to determine if this is a real threat to public health.

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