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Scientists unlock nature’s secret to super-selective binding

Scientists unlock nature’s secret to super-selective binding

Scientists have discovered a new way to create materials that bind selectively to specific molecules, potentially opening the door to new advances in the field of medicine and environmental cleanup.

The discovery was made by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

The key to this new method is a molecule known as an “imine.” Imines are formed when a nitrogen-containing compound reacts with another compound.

The team found that by carefully controlling the size and shape of an imine, they could create a material that would only bind to a specific target molecule.

This “super-selective binding” could be used to create new drugs that only bind to diseased cells, or to create materials that can absorb specific toxins from the environment.

“Our discovery could have a major impact on the field of medicine and environmental cleanup,” said Berkeley Lab chemist Frederick Tung, who led the research.

The research was published in the journal Nature Chemistry.

In a groundbreaking new study, scientists have succeeded in unlocking nature’s secret to super-selective binding.

This is a potentially huge breakthrough with implications for a wide range of applications, from medicine to materials science.

The research was led by scientists at the University of York in the UK. They succeeded in identifying a previously unknown mechanism that allows some materials to bind selectively to target molecules.

The mechanism operates at the atomic level and is based on a unique property of certain materials. This enables them to discriminate between different molecules in a way that is not possible with other materials.

The discovery could lead to the development of new materials with a wide range of applications. For example, it could be used to create more selective and effective drugs, or to develop new materials with a range of unique properties.

The research was published in the journal Nature Materials.

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