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Scientists warn of worsening heart disease as global warming sees temperatures soar

Scientists warn of worsening heart disease as global warming sees temperatures soar

As global temperatures continue to rise, scientists are warning that heart disease could become a worsening problem.

Higher temperatures can contribute to an increased risk of heart disease, as heat can contribute to dehydration, which can lead to an irregular heartbeat. In addition, hot weather can also lead to an increased release of air pollutants, which can cause inflammation and damage to the heart.

Global warming is expected to increase average temperatures worldwide by 2°C over the next few decades. This may not sound like much, but it can potentially have a huge impact on public health, particularly in relation to heart disease.

A recent study found that just a 1°C increase in temperature was associated with a 3.5% increase in the risk of heart failure. With global temperatures expected to increase by 2°C, this means that the risk of heart failure could potentially more than double.

While some people may be more vulnerable to the effects of heat than others, it is important to remember that everyone can be affected by hot weather. This is why it is so important to take steps to protect yourself from the heat, such as staying hydrated, wearing loose-fitting clothing, and avoiding strenuous activity during the hottest hours of the day.

With global warming expected to cause temperatures to continue to rise, it is important to be aware of the risks and take steps to protect your heart.

According to a new study, global warming is set to cause a significant rise in the number of people suffering from heart disease.

The research, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, predicts that rising temperatures will lead to an increase in the number of hospital admissions for heart conditions by up to 15 per cent by 2050.

The scientists say that the effects of climate change are already being felt, with hospital admissions for heart conditions rising by an average of 0.5 per cent each year since 2000.

Lead author Dr. Sotiria Stoukaki, from the University of Southampton, said: “This is the first study to quantify the impact of climate change on heart disease at a global scale.

“Our findings show that the number of people hospitalised with heart conditions will increase significantly as the world gets warmer.”

The study looked at data on hospital admissions for heart conditions from 2000 to 2016, and compared it with historical temperature data.

The researchers used this information to predict how rising temperatures would affect hospital admissions in the future.

They found that a one degree Celsius increase in temperature would lead to a 0.8 per cent increase in the number of hospital admissions for heart conditions.

The study also found that the effects of climate change are not evenly distributed across the globe.

Countries in the southern hemisphere, such as Australia and South Africa, are expected to see the biggest increases in hospital admissions for heart conditions.

This is because these countries are more vulnerable to heatwaves, which are predicted to become more common and more intense as the world gets warmer.

Dr. Stoukaki said: “As the world warms, we are likely to see more intense and prolonged heatwaves, which will have a significant impact on public health.

“There is an urgent need for health systems to be prepared for this increase in demand, and for communities to be aware of the risks.”

The researchers say that their findings highlight the need for urgent action to tackle climate change.

Dr. Stoukaki said: “This study is a stark reminder of the need to take action on climate change.

“If we do not, we are likely to see a significant increase in the number of people suffering from heart disease.”

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