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Slow-moving shell of water can make Parkinson’s proteins ‘stickier’

Slow-moving shell of water can make Parkinson’s proteins ‘stickier’

In a new study published in the journal Nature Communications, scientists have found that a slow-moving shell of water can make Parkinson’s proteins ‘stickier’.

The findings could have important implications for the development of new treatments for Parkinson’s, a progressive neurological condition that affects around one million people in the US.

Parkinson’s is caused by the loss of nerve cells in the brain that produce the chemical dopamine. This leads to problems with movement, including shaking, rigidity and difficulty in initiating and sustaining movements.

The new study shows how a protein called alpha-synuclein, which is found in the brains of people with Parkinson’s, can clump together and form sticky aggregates.

These alpha-synuclein aggregates are thought to play a key role in the progression of the disease.

The researchers used a technique called nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to study how alpha-synuclein behaves in water. They found that when the protein is in the presence of a slow-moving shell of water, it is more likely to clump together.

The findings suggest that the properties of water could be important in the development of Parkinson’s.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Rosa Rademakers, said: “Our findings could have important implications for the development of new treatments for Parkinson’s disease.

“We need to better understand how alpha-synuclein interacts with water, and how this interaction might be modulated to prevent the protein from clumping together.”

The findings could also help to explain why Parkinson’s tends to develop later in life.

As we age, our cells produce less dopamine and the proteins in our body become less soluble. This could make it more likely for alpha-synuclein to clump together and form the sticky aggregates that are thought to contribute to the disease.

Parkinson’s diseased is caused by the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that helps to control the movement of muscles. When dopamine levels are low, people with Parkinson’s disease can have difficulty moving and controlling their muscles.

A new study has found that a slow-moving shell of water can make the proteins that cause Parkinson’s disease “stickier.” The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom.

The researchers used a technique called nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to study how water molecules interact with the proteins that cause Parkinson’s disease. They found that when the water molecules are in a slow-moving shell, they can make the proteins “stickier.” This sticky interaction could help to explain why Parkinson’s disease proteins clump together in the brain and cause the death of dopaminergic neurons.

The findings of this study could lead to new treatments for Parkinson’s disease. If the proteins that cause Parkinson’s disease can be made less sticky, it may be possible to prevent the death of dopaminergic neurons.

Further studies are needed to confirm the findings of this study and to develop new treatments for Parkinson’s disease.

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