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Social support promotes rehab participation in mice after spinal cord injury

Social support promotes rehab participation in mice after spinal cord injury

After a spinal cord injury, social support may promote rehabilitation participation in mice, according to a new study.

Scientists found that when mice were housed with others in an enriched environment, they were more likely to participate in rehabilitation activities and recover some mobility.

The findings suggest that social support could be a important factor in motivating rehabilitation and helping people recover from spinal cord injuries.

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of California, Berkley.

In the study, mice were injured and then placed in either a standard cage or an enriched environment.

The enriched environment included a larger cage, toys, and other mice to interact with.

Mice in the enriched environment were more likely to participate in rehabilitation activities, such as using a treadmill.

They also recovered some mobility more quickly than mice in the standard cage.

The findings suggest that social support could be an important factor in motivating rehabilitation and helping people recover from spinal cord injuries.

Further research is needed to confirm the findings in humans.

But the study provides new insight into how social support may promote rehabilitation and recovery after a spinal cord injury.

After a spinal cord injury, social support can be key to helping mice participate in rehabilitative activities, new research suggests.

In a study published in the journal Cell Reports, scientists found that when mice were housed with other mice that had also undergone spinal cord injuries, they were more likely to participate in rehabilitative activities than mice that were housed alone.

This finding suggests that social support may be an important factor in promoting rehabilitation after a spinal cord injury.

“Our findings demonstrate that social support can promote rehabilitation in mice after a spinal cord injury,” said study author Anne Louise Oaklander, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School. “This finding has important Implications for the design of future rehabilitation programs for people with spinal cord injuries.”

The study involved two groups of mice: one that was housed alone and one that was housed with other mice that had also undergone spinal cord injuries.

Both groups of mice were given the opportunity to participate in rehabilitative activities, such as using a treadmill or ladder.

The researchers found that the mice that were housed with other mice that had also undergone spinal cord injuries were more likely to participate in these activities than the mice that were housed alone.

“This finding suggests that social support may be an important factor in promoting rehabilitation after a spinal cord injury,” Oaklander said.

The findings of this study could have implications for the design of future rehabilitation programs for people with spinal cord injuries.

“Our findings demonstrate that social support can promote rehabilitation in mice after a spinal cord injury,” said study author Anne Louise Oaklander, a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School. “This finding has important implications for the design of future rehabilitation programs for people with spinal cord injuries.”

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