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Study connects decomposing body’s BMI to surrounding soil microbes

Study connects decomposing body’s BMI to surrounding soil microbes

Decomposing bodies may not only provide sustenance for traditional scavengers like vultures, but also for the microbes in the soil, according to new research.

In a study published in the journal Ecosphere, scientists found that the body mass index (BMI) of a decomposing human body is correlated with the types of soil microbes found in the area surrounding the corpse.

Microbes are important for decomposition because they help break down complex organic matter into simpler compounds that can be used by plants and other organisms.

The study was conducted in Spain, where the researchers recruited 30 cadavers from a local funeral home. The cadavers were placed in cloth bags and buried in soil at different depths.

After eight months, the bodies had decomposed and the surrounding soil was collected and analyzed for microbial composition.

The researchers found that the soil surrounding the corpses with a higher BMI had a greater abundance of microbes that are known to be important for decomposition, such as bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas and fungi in the genus Penicillium.

Soil from the area around corpses with a lower BMI, on the other hand, had a greater abundance of microbes that are not typically associated with decomposition, such as bacteria in the genus Proteus and fungi in the genus Cladosporium.

The findings suggest that the different types of microbes found in the soil are correlated with the body mass index of the corpse, and that decomposing human bodies can provide a source of food for decomposer microbes.

The study provides new insight into the role of microbes in decomposition and has implications for forensic science and public health.

A recent study has found that there is a connection between the BMI of a decomposing body and the microbes in the surrounding soil. This is the first study to find such a connection, and it provides new insight into how human decomposition affects the environment.

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder, and it was published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. The researchers used data from a previous study that had measured the BMI of over 1,000 individuals who had died in the United States. They then compared this data to samples of soil collected from locations where these individuals had been buried.

The results of the study showed that there was a correlation between the BMI of the deceased and the types of microbes present in the soil. Specifically, the researchers found that higher BMI was associated with higher levels of fungi and lower levels of bacteria. The study did not find a correlation between BMI and the abundance of other soil microbes, such as viruses or protozoa.

This study provides new insights into how human decomposition affects the environment. The findings suggest that obese individuals may have a greater impact on the soil microbiome than people of normal weight. This is because obese individuals have more fat tissue, which is a major source of food for fungi. The findings of this study could have important implications for how we manage gravesites and bury the dead.

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