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Study finds dieters may overestimate the healthiness of their eating habits

Study finds dieters may overestimate the healthiness of their eating habits

If you’re trying to eat healthier, you may be overestimating how well you’re doing, according to a new study.

Researchers found that people who were trying to lose weight and eat healthier underestimated the number of unhealthy foods they ate, and overestimated the number of fruits and vegetables they ate.

The study, published in the journal Appetite, looked at 96 adults who were asked to recall what they ate over the course of two days. The participants were also asked to rate their own diets as “healthy,” “somewhat healthy” or “unhealthy.”

Overall, the participants underestimated the number of unhealthy food items they ate by about 50 percent, and overestimated the number of fruits and vegetables they ate by about the same amount.

The findings suggest that people may not be as aware of their own diet as they think they are, and that this could lead to underestimating the number of calories they’re eating and the amount of unhealthy foods they’re consuming.

This is a problem because it can lead to people thinking they’re eating healthier than they actually are, and not making the necessary changes to their diets.

If you’re trying to eat healthier, be sure to keep track of what you’re actually eating, so you can be sure you’re making the changes you need to make. A dietitian or nutritionist can also help you assess your diet and make necessary changes.

A new study has found that dieters may overestimate the healthiness of their eating habits. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Arizona, looked at a group of participants who were trying to lose weight. The participants were asked to rate the healthfulness of their diet on a scale of 1 to 10. The researchers found that the participants who rated their diet as being healthy were more likely to be overweight or obese than those who rated their diet as being unhealthy.

The study’s lead author, Dr. Amy Loughridge, said that the findings suggest that dieters may need to be more honest with themselves about the healthfulness of their diet. “If you’re not being honest with yourself about how healthy your diet really is, you’re not going to be able to make the changes you need to make in order to lose weight,” she said.

The study’s authors say that the findings could have implications for public health messages about diet and weight loss. They say that public health messages should avoid giving dieters the impression that their eating habits are healthier than they actually are.

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